Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 02-09-2020, 04:42 PM
AdamJL
Registered User

AdamJL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 110
Newbie Telescope (with EQ6R + camera gear)

Hi all

My kids are pushing me into "getting a telescope", so it's time to go down the rabbit hole that is astro-gear.

I'm coming at this from someone with Canon DSLRs and Big Whites. My initial plan was to get a solid mount (EQ6-R) and then look at the telescopes afterwards. This solution is a bit selfish because then my kids can't see "live" sky, so I need to add a telescope to this solution at the get-go.

I'd like to continue using my Canon cameras and lenses, but also be able to add a telescope on for the kids. I don't envisage using my 500 f/4, but the 300 f/2.8 should get a lot of use for me.
So if I get the EQ6-R, can someone recommend a telescope which will be

- light enough, when paired with my cameras/lenses to not stress the EQ6R
- ability to actually attach my camera and lens to it! (or vice versa)
- focal length to see deeper objects that my 300 won't capture
- ability to eventually attach my cameras directly if needed. Thinking about getting an EOS Ra in future if I stick to the hobby, so pairing with that would be grand.

Also happy to be swayed to another option for mount if needed. The EQ6R comes up in all my searches as a good mount, but I've no idea if there are better options.

Thanks in advance
Adam
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-09-2020, 05:24 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 5,480
Hi Adam, The Skywatcher 8" f/5 Newtonian is ideal for the job. All you need to attach a DSLR is the appropriate T-ring[ Canon are the most widely used in
astrophotography because they had more dedicated software than Nikon and others.] If you get a Newt make sure that it has enough back focus for photography; many Newts are suitable for visual use only. All Skywatcher
Newts are suitable. A 6" would do the job quite well, but an 8" would keep
you happy aperture wise for longer. You would need a coma corrector to
ensure round stars to the edge of the picture, but that can come later.
The scope weighs just over 9kgs which would leave plenty of load capacity
available for camera and accessories.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-09-2020, 07:50 PM
AdamJL
Registered User

AdamJL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 110
Thanks a million, raymo

I see you recommended a Newtonian. Is it because it's easy to use?

When I read this site, the middle one (refractor) piqued my interest because:

1. "Best performance per inch of aperture" and
2. (the big one) "Usually no need for user adjustment"

https://skywatcheraustralia.com.au/f...-buyers-guide/

These sway me. What would I be gaining going with the suggested Newt?

Also, do you or anyone else know the difference between the EQ6-R, EQ6-R Pro (guessing the same thing?) and the AZ-EQ6?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-09-2020, 09:09 PM
Startrek (Martin)
Registered User

Startrek is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,733
Adam
I started with a Canon 600D in my 6 f6 newt and HEQ5 mount nearly 4 years ago.
Progressed to an EQ6-R Mount with an 8 f5 newt still using the Canon 600D about 2 years ago and now recently have a dedicated ZWO OSC cooled camera in both newts
I retired the HEQ5 mount and upgraded to another EQ6-R mount for my 6 f6 newt now
All the above progression in AP over 4 years was thanks to the advice of many folk at IIS including Raymo !!!!
I also have a 12 f5 Goto dob I use for visual work at my dark site
I image in Sydney under Bortle 8 light polluted skies with my 6 f6 and image at my dark site ( weekender) south coast NSW with my 8 f5 newt
I still use the Canon 600D for planetary imaging and occasionally DSO imaging but my new ZWO OSC cooed camera is my main imaging camera now
Im a newt man through and through, they provide the best bang for your buck and are simple to use and maintain plus Im happy with my FOV and image scale ( they are not wide field imagers , Im up fairly close to objects )
Some examples of my latest images using my 6 and 8 newts attached
Cheers
Martin
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (DA7489F9-10FD-44B8-8BCD-905C9E349C6F.jpg)
202.5 KB19 views
Click for full-size image (7541562B-73F4-487F-B3F0-2F08775EA595.jpg)
220.7 KB17 views
Click for full-size image (2155F60B-5722-4A19-9FAB-66855C375B52.jpg)
209.0 KB15 views
Click for full-size image (3AC9B3A6-A0EB-4CB0-8B5A-2A6B9E49242D.jpg)
162.9 KB17 views
Click for full-size image (E789C1D9-CAB9-4607-B37F-650042143AFD.jpg)
218.9 KB17 views
Click for full-size image (0E2236DF-2633-46A9-B7B2-3D70816FAA3B.jpg)
190.8 KB20 views
Click for full-size image (2C35870A-FE8E-449F-870F-BAD65A363095.jpeg)
81.5 KB23 views
Click for full-size image (7DA11C96-0543-4D93-B81D-C581DF81578E.jpeg)
64.1 KB25 views
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-09-2020, 09:32 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 5,480
To put it briefly, if you want to have a crack at imaging all the different things up there, a 6 or 8" Newt is the best all rounder. If you have a specific type
of target in mind you could very likely do better with a different scope.
Refractors are good for splitting double stars for instance, and short focal length ones are great for widefield work.
For imaging planets and/or the moon a 150 or 180mm Maksutov is hard to beat.
I haven't kept up with the later models of the EQ6, someone else will help you with that.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-09-2020, 06:57 AM
Startrek (Martin)
Registered User

Startrek is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,733
EQ6-R is the same as the EQ6-R Pro

AZ EQ6 mount has both Azimuth and Equatorial design operation with slightly bigger payload than the EQ6-R mount

My 8 f5 with all imaging gear has a payload of 14.5kg which is about the maximum you want to put on the EQ-R mount ( maximum rated payload is 20kg but that rating is for visual observations just with an eye piece )

I think the AZ EQ6 has a maximum payload of 21kg visual use and 15 or 16kg Astrophotography ( imaging ) use

The Skywatcher Brand (accepts free open sourced EQMOD telescope control with a planetarium like Stellarium or Carts Du Ceil ) Celestron mounts dont.

The EQ6-R mount is a low cost , reliable 20kg class mount which performs extremely well in its class , very popular across the globe

Good luck !!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-09-2020, 08:39 AM
AdamJL
Registered User

AdamJL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Startrek View Post
Adam
I image in Sydney under Bortle 8 light polluted skies with my 6 f6 and image at my dark site ( weekender) south coast NSW with my 8 f5 newt
Martin
Thanks for the comments, Martin, especially this bit.
That's REALLY helpful to know. I'm also in Sydney, class 8 Bortle, so it's very good to know you image with similar kit that I'm aiming for. Any tips you care to share?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Startrek View Post
EQ6-R is the same as the EQ6-R Pro

AZ EQ6 mount has both Azimuth and Equatorial design operation with slightly bigger payload than the EQ6-R mount

My 8 f5 with all imaging gear has a payload of 14.5kg which is about the maximum you want to put on the EQ-R mount ( maximum rated payload is 20kg but that rating is for visual observations just with an eye piece )

I think the AZ EQ6 has a maximum payload of 21kg visual use and 15 or 16kg Astrophotography ( imaging ) use

The Skywatcher Brand (accepts free open sourced EQMOD telescope control with a planetarium like Stellarium or Carts Du Ceil ) Celestron mounts dont.

The EQ6-R mount is a low cost , reliable 20kg class mount which performs extremely well in its class , very popular across the globe

Good luck !!
Great tips, thanks mate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
To put it briefly, if you want to have a crack at imaging all the different things up there, a 6 or 8" Newt is the best all rounder. If you have a specific type
of target in mind you could very likely do better with a different scope.
Refractors are good for splitting double stars for instance, and short focal length ones are great for widefield work.
For imaging planets and/or the moon a 150 or 180mm Maksutov is hard to beat.
I haven't kept up with the later models of the EQ6, someone else will help you with that.
raymo
cheers raymo. I was reading more into refractors yesterday, and I think I'll go with a newt Maybe get a refractor later on as well but will go for the newt for now.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-09-2020, 08:39 AM
AdamJL
Registered User

AdamJL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 110
Also, does anyone use the EQ6R "in the field" if so, what portable power supply?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 24-09-2020, 09:14 AM
AdamJL
Registered User

AdamJL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 110
Hi all.

I ended up getting an EQ6-R and a Skywatcher 80ED.

Now I just need some help to connect my camera (Canon) to the scope.
I'll be using a mix of bodies; Full Frame, 1.3 crop and 1.6 crop

I know I need a Canon adapter (looking at Skywatcher M48... any alternatives?) but do I then need a field flattener OR the M48 extension tube? Do I have to get both, or can I get away with one?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 10:15 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Limpet Controller
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement