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Old 24-09-2009, 09:12 AM
Kat5e (Kat)
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What do I need?

Hi All,

I have a 12" LX200 Classic, wedge and some sort of guide scope which came with the LX200 (refractor 4" ish)

I can borrow my dads unmodified Canon EOS 350D and I have access to a Logitech webcam and a laptop/PC.

What do I need to connect all this up to do photography (messier objects)? Was thinking webcam can be used to autoguide on the refractor?

What Software/Hardware/Cables is required? (got the adapter to connect the camera to the scope already from my previous setup)

Thanks and sorry for the beginner questions! I have had a look though this forum for answers but couldn't find them

P.S - previous setup was a EQ5 mount, 8" Newtonian which has now been sold
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  #2  
Old 24-09-2009, 09:32 AM
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[1ponders] (Paul)
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Hi Kat. You are really going in the deep end here. Trying to image and autoguide a 12" LX200 classic first up will be a challenge. First thing we need to know is if the classic has an autoguiding port. Assuming it has then you will need to bring the 12" focal length down a bit with a Focal Reducer. A meade 6.3 FR at least, though 3.3 would be a better. Unfortunately the 3.3 isn't really suitable for DLSR size chips. You will need someway of mounting the guidescope to the top of the 12" as well as adjustable guide rings. What sort of guidescope is it? If it's of good enough quality then you may well be better off imaging through the guidescope and guiding through the 12".

btw the 12" would be great for planetary imaging with a webcam and barlow. For that all you would need is the capture program (stark labs have a free program called craterlet) and Registax for processing the AVI you capture.

That's just the tip of the iceberg. I'm sure others will pipe up with other recommendations.
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Old 24-09-2009, 10:08 AM
Kat5e (Kat)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by [1ponders] View Post
First thing we need to know is if the classic has an autoguiding port.
I shall have to check this but from reading online it seems to as so many people use this telescope for photography

Quote:
Originally Posted by [1ponders] View Post
Focal Reducer. A meade 6.3 FR
Forgot to mention this was included in the sale

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Originally Posted by [1ponders] View Post
You will need someway of mounting the guidescope to the top of the 12" as well as adjustable guide rings.
Again, forgot to mention that all this was included in the sale!

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What sort of guidescope is it?
i'm not sure what scope it is actually it has no branding on it... to be honest I haven't even looked though it yet!
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Old 24-09-2009, 11:07 AM
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[1ponders] (Paul)
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The guidescope is probably a fairly cheap achromat, but if it's something like an ED80 then that should definitely be your deep sky imaging scope for a while.

Maybe someone from Melbourne with astrophotography experience with an LX will pop in to this thread. It would make it a lot easier for you.

As far as other equipment goes you will also need a Canon T-ring, a T adapter and an SC adapter to attach the camera to the Focal reducer. The SC Adapter probably came with the scope if you have a Focal Reducer. The SC Adapter just looks like a short 2" pipe with a thread on one end. If you are stuck for an SC adapter (which goes in the front of the FR then you can always use one of these, an Orion Prime Focus adapter and screw the silver barrel out.) Focusing is always an issue so a Bahtinov mask will help and with SCT you have a moving primary mirror for focusing so think down the future of a zero shift focuser

Here's an image of my setup (without the focuser which I now have). http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/a...se.php?a=17826

Welcome to the money pit.
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Old 24-09-2009, 11:53 AM
Kat5e (Kat)
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Welcome to the money pit.
I think that is astronomy in a nutshell!

Please keep the comments coming and I shall have a play around with what I have
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Old 24-09-2009, 12:05 PM
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You will need to polar align your scope/wedge combo. There are plenty of directions around. For the time being I'd suggest getting the webcam and having a go at Jupiter until you feel more comfortable with the equipment.
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Old 24-09-2009, 12:28 PM
Kat5e (Kat)
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Originally Posted by [1ponders] View Post
You will need to polar align your scope/wedge combo. There are plenty of directions around. For the time being I'd suggest getting the webcam and having a go at Jupiter until you feel more comfortable with the equipment.
I have found a few websites and I'm eagerly waiting to give it a go!
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Old 24-09-2009, 12:42 PM
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[1ponders] (Paul)
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Here's the link to Craterlet

and the one for Registax.
These'll get you started on planetary imaging.
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Old 24-09-2009, 08:30 PM
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Focusing is always an issue so a Bahtinov mask will help and with SCT you have a moving primary mirror for focusing so think down the future of a zero shift focuser
I don't quite understand this. I have a Celestron motor focuser on my C8 and it solves the problem of scope vibration (and wearing out your fingertips) when you focus. It doesn't address the mirror flop.

Would I still have the flop with a Crayford? eg JMI EV1cm

Is there any way to lock the mirror after a rough focus and do the final with a Crayford? Depending on what is on the visual back the focal position moves more than I think a Crayford can handle.

Quote:
Welcome to the money pit.
It keeps getting deeper.
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Old 25-09-2009, 12:11 PM
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[1ponders] (Paul)
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I'm not talking about mirror flop Andrew, just mirror shift when focusing, unless you have a way of locking the mirror then yes you will still have flop with JMI etc.

I don't think there is with the Celestrons, which is one of the reasons I like my meade so much. Rough focus, lock it off and then use the JMI.
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