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Old 27-07-2006, 07:18 PM
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Barb and David

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Meteor Shower Photography HELP !!!!!!!

I hope someone can help please

I have a reasonably basic Sony Cybershot Digital Camera and wondered if I would be able to get any photos of the upcoming Meteor Shower tomorrow night " Weather permiting"

The camera is a 4.1 MP - 3X optial zoom- and 6x digital. I can use it on auto or manual which enables me to change ISO, Shutter speed, Aperture and I can also use it on Video.

Any advice on settings for taking some shots of the Meteor Showers would be very much appreciated.

Or am I asking too much of my little camera ?

Barb
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Old 27-07-2006, 07:50 PM
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Hi Barb

Meteor imaging can be a challenge at the best of times, and with the speed that meteors pass by, could just be a bit much for Digital Cameras to capture.
I have done much imaging in this field and have found, to date that a simple Film SLR, with bulb setting, and a fast fixed focus lens of at least F1.4 or F1.8 is the most suitable
I use an old Olympus OM 2 Camera with a F1.4 lens set a infinity and expose as long as possible, both tracking or fixed tripod, non tracking.
Depending on the area you live in Sky Fogging can also be a problem.
A film ASA speed of 400 is usually used with HP5, Black and White Film.

Hope this helps, Leon
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Old 27-07-2006, 08:15 PM
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Barb and David

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Thanks Leon.....I guess it was a bit much to ask of my little Sony but I thought maybe changing the settings might help.

All we can hope for is clear skies just for viewing alone. It seems as though it will be something special anyway. Our home site looking East is usually free of any light pollution so with clear skies we might be lucky enough to have a special view.

Here's hoping

Thanks

Barb
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Old 27-07-2006, 08:31 PM
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Astroman (Andrew Wall)
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If the meteor showers were a little more active then you could try, but the meteor showers around this time are not that frequent. I would say you would be lucky to get three in an hour.
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Old 27-07-2006, 08:31 PM
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Barb, i hope your view will be special.
Myself, and some other members are going to spend the night at Snake Valley, (you know that place that Ken owns) only joshing....
However we hope to see many meteors, and if not we will spend our time moving oue chins up and down.

Clear skies to all.

Leon
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Old 27-07-2006, 09:58 PM
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ballaratdragons (Ken)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Astroman
If the meteor showers were a little more active then you could try, but the meteor showers around this time are not that frequent. I would say you would be lucky to get three in an hour.
Have been seeing at least 3 - 4 a minute last night and the night before, Astrew!

@ Leon!!! I don't own Snake Valley!!!!

Just half of it
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Old 27-07-2006, 11:02 PM
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astroron (Ron)
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We saw lots of meteors at Astrofest
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Old 28-07-2006, 12:22 AM
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must be my polluted skies
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Old 28-07-2006, 06:51 AM
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Hi Barb,

What is the longest exposure time on your camera? My cybershot is 30 seconds. If yours is the same set up camera on tripod pionting at the area where the meteors are the most frequent. Have your lens set on its widest view. Set iso on highest number. Camera set on manual. Manual focus on infinity. Press shutter via remote device or use delay timer, if you don't have one. Just keep clicking away, delete the shots without any action and keep the others.

Its a bit hit and miss. But you are not wasting film. Also set lens at its widest opening=lowest f number.

Good luck.
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Old 28-07-2006, 11:07 AM
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Barb and David

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Thanks Lester, my Cybershot has the same manual features as yours. So I will be able to adjust it to the settings that you've suggested. It has a delay timer which I can use also.

Although I know it's hit and miss maybe I might be lucky and get a HIT!!

All I need is a clear night to give it a go

Thanks again for your help

Barb
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Old 28-07-2006, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leon
Meteor imaging can be a challenge at the best of times, and with the speed that meteors pass by, could just be a bit much for Digital Cameras to capture.
I have done much imaging in this field and have found, to date that a simple Film SLR, with bulb setting, and a fast fixed focus lens of at least F1.4 or F1.8 is the most suitable
Digital is up to the task - but you really need a DSLR. You can use the same technique as for film, noise becomes a hassle after a while - but 10 minutes exposures are not too bad.
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Old 29-07-2006, 12:06 PM
IanW
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The best method I've used is an image intensifier (night sight, starlight intensifier etc) attached to a video camera on a tripod.
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