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Old 04-05-2008, 02:36 PM
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Which DSLR? (& should I turn to the dark side?)

Hi All, I'm toying with a foray over to the dark side of imaging (from lunar and planetary) and thought one of the Canon DSLR's would be the way to go from what I've read. I've had a poke around in the various threads and have learned a bit but would appreciate some direct advice. Some questions:

of these which is best for unmodified imaging and relative cost/benefit?
350D
20D
40D
400D

if I get camera body only are lenses readily puchased separately?

what's needed to hook these up to a C9.25 and what guiding options are people using? Expect though mostly people are imaging on small apos on top of things like 9.25s?

finally, I've read a fair bit of modifications and whether they're worth it or not. I'm thinking a camera mainly for astro here, but it would always be nice to know it could be put to standard use. Thoughts?

Many Thanks,

Rob
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Old 04-05-2008, 02:51 PM
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[1ponders] (Paul)
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G'day Rob, it's been awhile.

I guess I'm prejudiced here Rob, but.... I've had the unmodded 300D and just taken possession (and it really is possession, no-one is going to put one greasy dirty little finger mark on my new precious ) of the UV/IR modded 20D and it's great to use. Also with the filter mod it will also still come to focus using standar Canon EF lenses. You can still use it for daylight photos as long as you create a custom white balance. np

Guiding a C9.25 with DSLR on and EQ5 will be a challenge though, as would putting it on an LXD75. I'd suggest getting a smaller scope (ED80/100 etc) to start with. There are plenty of threads around on what's needed to autoguide but basically.

1. Mount with sufficient weight and accuracy tolerances and autoguide capabilities.
2. Webcam or similar
3. Second scope or Off Axis Guider ( )
4. Guide program (PhD Guiding, Guidemaster etc (free))
5. Guider interface between PC and Mount; Shoestring Astronomy - GPUSB
6. Masochistic tendencies.

Where we go from here is up to you
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Old 04-05-2008, 02:57 PM
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vash (Ashley)
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well I put my 2 cents in.

I have a stock 350D, I find it great though not the best for red nebulae.
Of the cameras you mentioned my pick would be the 40D, but you should also consider a 450D.
The reasons for the choice of these 2 camera is the fact that they are both 14 bit and have live focus, a real helpful way of achieving good focus.
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Old 04-05-2008, 05:13 PM
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I'm in the other direction. If you are undecided as to whether you will stick at this, and I mean that in the nicest way, stick with a used camera, and the cheaper the better. Try it, and if it works for you, carry on. If not abort and go back to the lunar/planetary stuff. Modding is definitely the way to go, but many have turned out exceptional images with bog standard gear, at least until they work out that they do want better. Keep it simple to start with. Great fun, but a challenge as well, same as lunar and planetary.
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Old 05-05-2008, 08:27 AM
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Thanks for the advice guys, much appreciated...

so of the cameras mentioned anymore on the relative cost/benefit of the various types mentioned...e.g sensitivity, resolution, features, versus cost?

cheers,

rob
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Old 05-05-2008, 10:11 AM
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iceman (Mike)
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Hi Rob

It's a very slippery slope.. once you start the ride/slide it's very difficult to get off

What scope do you plan to image through?
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Old 05-05-2008, 01:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iceman View Post
Hi Rob

It's a very slippery slope.. once you start the ride/slide it's very difficult to get off

What scope do you plan to image through?
Hi Mike, one I haven't got yet

If I went this path I guess I'd start with an ED80 of some sort. Would need to work out some sort of piggy back arrangement.

cheers,

Rob
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