ICEINSPACE
Most Read Articles
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON First Quarter
43.8%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney*
9:50 am
Perth
6:50 am
Auckland*
11:50 am
New York
5:50 pm
Paris
11:50 pm
GMT
10:50 pm




Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:06 PM
rob.scott (Robert)
Registered User

rob.scott is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Buderim
Posts: 1
GSO 10" dob vs Skywatcher

Newbie - contemplating GSO dobsonian 10 or 12"
- good first scope choice?
- pitfalls of this ?
- advice?

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-10-2018, 08:12 PM
nsavage (Nick)
Registered User

nsavage is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 20
I can't compare the brands but I can say that I went with a SkyWatcher 8 inch Dob for my first scope a few months ago and am so far extremely happy with it. I did add the Lacerta 10:1 focuser upgrade however which is very nice. Quality wise I was very happy. So much so that I have another 8 inch F/5 on the way for Astrophotography.

I can't compare size against the 10" or 12" either but I will say that the 8" is surprisingly bigger than I expected and whilst it is easy enough to move around I feel that the 10" would be too cumbersome for me to take out of the home regularly.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-10-2018, 09:17 PM
Startrek (Martin)
Registered User

Startrek is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 351
I just sold my first scope 2 weeks ago which was a 10” Bintel GSO solid tube dob manually operated. A great scope to start off with, had it 2 years and enjoyed nudging around the night sky. It was stored in my garage and pulled out on a flat bed trolley to my obs location 6 metres away. I wouldn’t consider a 10” if your observing at a remote location,it’s a big scope ( but a lot of people do ) An 8” would much easier to handle if it’s being transported away from home.
I now have a Skywatcher 12” GoTo Dob , still stored in the garage and I use a parcel trolley to pull it out and set up.
Both GSO and Sky-Watcher are manufactured in Taiwan / China with a reasonable level of quality and finish.As far as optics go I’d say the Sky-Watcher is a little better than the GSO but the difference is marginal dependant on your eye pieces. I thought my GSO dual focuser was much smoother and a better feel than the Sky-Watcher dual focuser.Skywatcher have recdeveloped, expanded and pushed their products world wide for the past 5 or 6 years especially in the US.They have a great product range across the board now
If your intending to use your first scope at home and away I would recommend either the 8” GSO solid tube or the Skywatcher 8” solid tube dob and if the budget can stretch a bit maybe the 8” Sky-Watcher collapsible GoTo Dob
If your just going to use the scope permanently at home go for the 10” GSO solid tube dob or 10” Skywatcher solid tube dob
My 2 cents worth .......
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-10-2018, 12:13 PM
N1 (Mirko)
Registered User

N1 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Dunners Nu Zulland
Posts: 935
Having owned the 6" version of the Skywatcher, and the 8" and the 10" GSOs, my impression is that the SW is of slightly better quality overall than the GSO dobs (optically the 6" was outstanding, not least because of its relaxed f ratio of 8, and a great scope for the planets), but the GSO certainly aren't junk either and I actually prefer their focuser over the SW unit. My copy of the Skywatcher dob did not have a proper 2" interface, but some odd, threaded thing that was supposed to make attaching a camera easier but needed an adaptor for 2" eyepieces. My RC astrograph (a GSO) has proper 2" fittings so the SW solution seems unnecessary. My ultimate pick of the 3 was the 8" GSO, giving the best package of aperture, cost, portability and serviceability (mirror comes out for a wash every so often) and has been a great workhorse ever since I got it 3 years ago. The MDF mount is starting to show some wear but the OTA is still in great shape, despite countless trips in the back seat of my car. I sold my 10" GSO dob when moving to NZ permanently - a great scope, but a bit too great to fit on the plane with me, unlike the 8". One thing I noticed about the 10" is that the tube seems unnecessarily large at nearly 12" external diameter, leaving a big gap of unused space around the mirror. The 8" is more efficient in that respect and its tube much smaller than the 2" difference suggests.

Re 10" vs. 12" - I had the same question before buying the 10", and some of that decision making process happened here.

Edit: duplicate post deleted

Last edited by N1; 12-10-2018 at 10:42 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-10-2018, 06:26 PM
doppler's Avatar
doppler (Rick)
Registered User

doppler is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Mackay
Posts: 1,413
Quote:
Originally Posted by N1 View Post
One thing I noticed about the 10" is that the tube seems unnecessarily large at nearly 12" external diameter, leaving a big gap of unused space around the mirror. The 8" is more efficient in that respect and its tube much smaller than the 2" difference suggests.

I have a 10" skywatcher dob and the tube has a much smaller diameter than the GSO. I have GSO tube rings on it and had to pad them out (about 30mm less diameter than GSO) My 10" fits on the back seat of a lancer with the dob base, so go the aperture, 15kgs is not a big weight.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-10-2018, 09:03 AM
N1 (Mirko)
Registered User

N1 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Dunners Nu Zulland
Posts: 935
Quote:
Originally Posted by doppler View Post
I have a 10" skywatcher dob and the tube has a much smaller diameter than the GSO. I have GSO tube rings on it and had to pad them out (about 30mm less diameter than GSO) My 10" fits on the back seat of a lancer with the dob base, so go the aperture, 15kgs is not a big weight.

That would settle it for me
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 21-10-2018, 05:38 PM
AndrewF (Andrew)
Registered User

AndrewF is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Warragul, VIC
Posts: 5
I've had a skywatcher 12" and currently have a GSO 12". I can't see any difference as far as the optics are concerned.

The GSO version has a lot of nifty features that make it nicer to use like a right angle finder, tension knobs, micro-adjust focuser, single 1.25/2" adaptor, quicker to collimate etc.

HOWEVER, it also feels like it might fall to pieces in a few years time. The Skywatcher was a lot more solid even if it didn't have the above features.

I'd just go for whichever one you can find the cheapest.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 22-10-2018, 07:39 AM
Merlin66's Avatar
Merlin66 (Ken)
Spectroscopy Wizard

Merlin66 is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: St Leonards, Vic
Posts: 6,355
Robert,
Based on thirty years experience with many Dobbies and other reflectors I would say a 10” aperture represents a sweet spot, much more light grasp than a 8” and certainly not as large and heavy as a 12”.
You are more likely to get out and use the 10” and the views it will give give you may even exceed your expectations.......
Highly recommended.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 22-10-2018, 07:57 AM
glend (Glen)
Registered User

glend is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Lake Macquarie, NSW
Posts: 4,790
Andrews is running their 10% off sale on both the Skywatcher and GSO dobs for the rest of this week. A good time to buy. I have had 10", 12", and 16" GSO dobs and they are good quality scopes, and the Alt bearing brakes are first class. Having looked through many dobs over the years I still believe the GSO mirrors are higher quality than the Skywatcher ones. However, GSO do not make Goto versions of their dobs, and I don't understand why. Given the 10% off sale I would be buying the Skywatcher 10" goto dob, it is heavier than the push to version but it is easier to use and you don't need to worry about setting circles and other things, like Nexus wifi and encoders added to the GSO to see where the scope is pointed.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 22-10-2018, 03:55 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,440
You do have to take care that if you buy a GSO dob that it has sufficient back focus to allow the use of a DSLR; many of their past models didn't
[unless advertised as an astrograph.] I don't know if it has changed with their latest models. SW models always have, and still do, as far as I know.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 22-10-2018, 04:38 PM
astro744
Registered User

astro744 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 746
I bought a used SW 10" f4.7 for the kids and whilst it is a nice 'scope to use it does have one annoying feature in the focuser. I cannot fully insert my 2" Astrosystems laser collimator as there is a stop inside the draw tube of the focuser making it difficult to see the return beam from inside the tube.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 22-10-2018, 07:05 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,440
There must be something wrong Astro, the 2" adaptor that fits onto the focuser so that you can use 2" eyepieces is about 56mm deep[from memory].
How far in does your laser collimator have to go? My laser collimator slides in
fully, which is about 25MM. I don't have the scope any more, so I can't compare anything, but I don't remember any stop in the draw tube. Are you using the adaptor when collimating? The stop is not something to do with using 1.25" eyepieces is it?
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 23-10-2018, 04:46 AM
astro744
Registered User

astro744 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 746
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
There must be something wrong Astro, the 2" adaptor that fits onto the focuser so that you can use 2" eyepieces is about 56mm deep[from memory].
How far in does your laser collimator have to go? My laser collimator slides in
fully, which is about 25MM. I don't have the scope any more, so I can't compare anything, but I don't remember any stop in the draw tube. Are you using the adaptor when collimating? The stop is not something to do with using 1.25" eyepieces is it?
raymo
My SW focuser is the black body type. The focuser body height is 60mm. A 12mm collar with a male thread and single locking screw screws directly into the draw tube which is part of the focuser body. It is this collar that has the internal stop preventing any 2" accessory from protruding further into the draw tube. A 45mm 2" eyepiece adaptor (labelled as such) with a tapered base connects to the 12mm collar and is held in place via the single screw. The entire adaptor can be rotated by loosening the single screw. I believe this is where one would replace the 2" adaptor and add a shorter T-Ring if wanting to attach a camera thereby gaining 45mm less the thickness of the T-Ring.

Im not sure of the purpose of stop inside the collar but it prevents any 2" accessory being lowered further into the draw tube. My Astrosystems laser is 2" diameter and just over 100mm long (4"). The approx 5mm Barlow attachment clips onto the end of the collimator. To see the return beam whether with Barlow attachment or not I need the end of the collimator visible from inside the OTA but because it is unable to travel that last 60mm it means it cannot be seen at all making collimation impossible with this particular collimator. (It woks very well on my other custom 10" with GSO focuser).

In fact even a Paracorr cannot be fully inserted, something which for f4.7 could be more used than not. The Paracorr 2" part is 60mm long and sticks out 15mm because of the collar meaning I cannot reach focus with it in place.

As I said I bought this for the kids and they will be using without a Paracorr and so far it has provided some very pleasing views and I am happy with it as it is relatively light and small for a 10" telescope.

If I had access to a lathe (and knew how to use one) I would bore out the stop and problem solved, (or I'll just get some 1.25" collimation accessories).
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 23-10-2018, 07:03 AM
Allan_L's Avatar
Allan_L (Allan)
Member > 10year club

Allan_L is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central Coast NSW
Posts: 2,989
Quote:
Originally Posted by astro744 View Post
My SW focuser is the black body type. The focuser body height is 60mm. A 12mm collar with a male thread and single locking screw screws directly into the draw tube which is part of the focuser body. It is this collar that has the internal stop preventing any 2" accessory from protruding further into the draw tube. A 45mm 2" eyepiece adaptor (labelled as such) with a tapered base connects to the 12mm collar and is held in place via the single screw. The entire adaptor can be rotated by loosening the single screw. I believe this is where one would replace the 2" adaptor and add a shorter T-Ring if wanting to attach a camera thereby gaining 45mm less the thickness of the T-Ring.

Im not sure of the purpose of stop inside the collar but it prevents any 2" accessory being lowered further into the draw tube. My Astrosystems laser is 2" diameter and just over 100mm long (4"). The approx 5mm Barlow attachment clips onto the end of the collimator. To see the return beam whether with Barlow attachment or not I need the end of the collimator visible from inside the OTA but because it is unable to travel that last 60mm it means it cannot be seen at all making collimation impossible with this particular collimator. (It woks very well on my other custom 10" with GSO focuser).

In fact even a Paracorr cannot be fully inserted, something which for f4.7 could be more used than not. The Paracorr 2" part is 60mm long and sticks out 15mm because of the collar meaning I cannot reach focus with it in place.

As I said I bought this for the kids and they will be using without a Paracorr and so far it has provided some very pleasing views and I am happy with it as it is relatively light and small for a 10" telescope.

If I had access to a lathe (and knew how to use one) I would bore out the stop and problem solved, (or I'll just get some 1.25" collimation accessories).
This is true.
My Paracorr did not fully go into the focus tube either. (SW 10" DOB).
I read somewhere about a hack, to file around the tube enough to allow the Paracorr to fully insert.
This I did and now all seems well.
But I too am wondering why it was there in the first place.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 23-10-2018, 09:24 AM
doug mc's Avatar
doug mc
Registered User

doug mc is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mt Tamborine
Posts: 340
Having used both brands over the years, i found the GSO mount to be MUCH smoother to operate at higher powers.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 23-10-2018, 01:03 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,440
O.K Allan and Astro, I've been thinking back and having reread your posts
I sort of think I know what is going on.
Mounting a DSLR is simplicity itself. The tube that an 1.25" eyepiece
slides into is mounted on a flat plate that has a bevel on the side opposite to the eyepiece tube so it can be secured into the collar by the retaining screws on the outside of the collar. The eyepiece tube unscrews from the plate, exposing a male thread on the plate which screws directly into the T-ring on the DSLR. This provides about 12mm of back focus. Just remove the flat plate from the focuser ; with the tube removed just screw the flat plate into the camera's T-ring. Put the camera in place on the focuser, rotate the camera to a convenient position and nip up the securing screws on the outside of the focuser collar.
2" eyepieces or other 2"accessories are not meant to enter the draw tube at all. The aforementioned flat plate that has the tube for 1.25" eyepieces on it is removed from the collar, and the 2" eyepiece adaptor is inserted into the collar, and the securing screws on the outside of the collar nipped up. A 2" eyepiece, or any other 2" accessory can slide in to the full depth of the 2" adaptor. SW have never explained this in their manuals; many people have been confused.
raymo

Last edited by raymo; 23-10-2018 at 01:09 PM. Reason: more text
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 23-10-2018, 02:53 PM
Allan_L's Avatar
Allan_L (Allan)
Member > 10year club

Allan_L is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central Coast NSW
Posts: 2,989
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
O.K Allan and Astro, I've been thinking back and having reread your posts
I sort of think I know what is going on.
Mounting a DSLR is simplicity itself. The tube that an 1.25" eyepiece
slides into is mounted on a flat plate that has a bevel on the side opposite to the eyepiece tube so it can be secured into the collar by the retaining screws on the outside of the collar. The eyepiece tube unscrews from the plate, exposing a male thread on the plate which screws directly into the T-ring on the DSLR. This provides about 12mm of back focus. Just remove the flat plate from the focuser ; with the tube removed just screw the flat plate into the camera's T-ring. Put the camera in place on the focuser, rotate the camera to a convenient position and nip up the securing screws on the outside of the focuser collar.
2" eyepieces or other 2"accessories are not meant to enter the draw tube at all. The aforementioned flat plate that has the tube for 1.25" eyepieces on it is removed from the collar, and the 2" eyepiece adaptor is inserted into the collar, and the securing screws on the outside of the collar nipped up. A 2" eyepiece, or any other 2" accessory can slide in to the full depth of the 2" adaptor. SW have never explained this in their manuals; many people have been confused.
raymo
yep. I have often told people of the method to attach DSLR to the 1.25 plate, and done it myself.
But this does not have anything to do with the problem of attaching a Paracorr to the 2" focus tube, as far as I can see?
From memory, the part that had to be filed off was on the actual draw tube itself. (But, Its been a while since I did it).

But cheers, good talk to you again. Actually I am pretty sure I originally learnt about the T Ring attachment method from one of your earlier posts.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 23-10-2018, 03:12 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,440
Why would a Paracorr have to be inserted more than the 50mm or so that the eyepiece adaptor allows. My 2" collimator and my 2" barlow worked fine, what is different about a Paracorr? I've never owned one.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 23-10-2018, 03:32 PM
astro744
Registered User

astro744 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 746
Thanks raymo but I too concur with Allan_L. The issue with the stop inside the 12mm collar preventing 2" accessories from being fully inserted is puzzling since removing this stop would have no impact on the use of the focuser both visially or photographically.

I have no desire to photograph with this telescope and am aware of the pros and cons of various focusers out there and that some are better designed to equip a camera than others. In fact the best photo-visual focuser that I have ever used and still have is the Tectron Telescopes focuser made by the same company that used to make quality collimation tools (Sarasota, Florida). I only replaced it on my 6" f5.5 because I not longer do photography and this focuser also has no compression clamps although I will replace brass screws with nylon one day.

This focuser had a separate base plate to which you either insert the visual body or photo body and they were designed such that the photo body could be made parfocal with the visual body to suit any eyepiece/SLR combination. It worked very well for me at the time.

Back to the SW stop issue, I too will file it out as it is really a non-essential item. No other focuser that I have come across prevents accessories from being inserted inside the draw tube.

As to the original post I have not used a GSO scope so cannot compare but the 10" SW does the kids nicely and is not too heavy and has plenty of aperture in a compact size. I would recommend looking in a store at both before you buy and judge for yourself.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 23-10-2018, 03:44 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,440
I can't fathom out for the life of me why any 2" accessory needs to enter the draw tube at all, the focal point is well outside the draw tube; certainly eyepieces, barlows and collimators don't.
The 2" adaptor allows accessories to slide in about 50mm, how much more do you need?
raymo

Last edited by raymo; 23-10-2018 at 03:49 PM. Reason: more text
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 08:50 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Atik Horizon
Advertisement
SkyWatcher WiFi Adaptor
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
FLI Cameras and Imaging Accessories
Advertisement
SkyWatcher 2018 Catalogue
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Interest Free Finance
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement