#841  
Old 15-03-2009, 10:36 PM
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Chillie (Henry)
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Hi Mike,

Thanks for the welcome and the info.

I checked out your equipment page earlier this afternoon on another computer (not logged in), and yeah, it does look big. There is another member on here (can't think of his name but his username does have 3 letters) who has a 12" truss Sky-Watcher Dobsonian in his Avatar with him standing next to it.

I have a mate who has a 12" truss Sky-Watcher Dobsonian. I'll have a look through his before buying one myself. A 12" solid tube is a bit too big for my ute without making a special container to go in the back.

Cheers,
Henry.
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  #842  
Old 19-04-2009, 09:48 AM
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evad2009 (David)
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Help!!

Are any of you guys in the Glasshouse/Beerwah or Sunshine Coast area and know how to set up a Go-To upgrade kit? I've installed the kit and followed the instructions in the handbook. The hand-set is working fine exept that I can't get the scope (150x1200mm Skywatcher refractor on EQ5 mount) to skew to the chosen star/planet..

I have a feeling that I may not have properly aligned the scope to South Polar. I did this using a compass (don't have a polar-scope), adjusting the angle to 11.25 East. This was the true South position I got from the local airfield.
Any advice will be very welcome.
Thanks guys.
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  #843  
Old 20-04-2009, 02:19 PM
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rodroger (Rodney)
Rod Burgess

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Hi,
I suggest you align the scope by the drift method to get anaccurate result possible. Method is described under the "Project Articles" link on this site. This is the method I use to get anaccurate alignment for Astrophotography. You will need an illuminated retculated eyepiece to get a quick grasp on the direction the star travels. I made an unilluminted one from a 12mm eyepiece, glued fine hair (human) as cross hairs on the inside stop of the eyepiece. I do need to use a 2x Barlows to get the shadow of the hair without any illumination, but it works.
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  #844  
Old 21-04-2009, 04:10 PM
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evad2009 (David)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodroger View Post
Hi,
I suggest you align the scope by the drift method to get anaccurate result possible. Method is described under the "Project Articles" link on this site. This is the method I use to get anaccurate alignment for Astrophotography. You will need an illuminated retculated eyepiece to get a quick grasp on the direction the star travels. I made an unilluminted one from a 12mm eyepiece, glued fine hair (human) as cross hairs on the inside stop of the eyepiece. I do need to use a 2x Barlows to get the shadow of the hair without any illumination, but it works.
Thanks Rod, I don't have an illuminated reticule eyepiece but your home made one eems like a good idea. I have aspare 10mm eyepiece, so I might try that. Happy viewing....
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  #845  
Old 23-04-2009, 10:59 AM
Dimmy (Damon)
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Hi guys, this is my first post here and I really have to say this site is a gem for information! Just a newbie getting into astronomy and looking at getting my first scope. Have decided on getting a 10" DOB. At the stage where Kevin Rudds little bonus is burning a hole in my pocket so I am fretting over getting the new collapsable one for $799 or the older style for $690.. The older style has a "paraboloidal mirror" not sure about the new one.. If anyone can give me some pros/cons would me greatly appreciated. Cheers!
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  #846  
Old 23-04-2009, 11:04 AM
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iceman (Mike)
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Hi Damon
to IceInSpace!

The two types of dob's will have the same mirror. The difference between the collapsible and tube style really comes down to portability. Depends where you'll observe from, how you'll transport your scope, how you'll store it, etc.

Do a search or have a look through some other beginners/equipment discussion threads as there's been quite a bit of discussion about the new collapsible ones.

Cheers
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  #847  
Old 04-05-2009, 09:27 AM
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evad2009 (David)
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Hi Damon
Welcome to stargazing! I'm a newbie too and recently purchased a 10" Skywatcher collapsible Dob. I'm very happy with all aspects of it and would recommend it to anyone. Hope this helps.

David.
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  #848  
Old 06-05-2009, 09:01 AM
Dimmy (Damon)
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Yeah the 10" Dob seem like a goer, cant wait to get my hands on it.

Would anyone mind explaining what effect the moon has on star gazing.
Is it better with a full/new moon or without?

Thanks!
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  #849  
Old 06-05-2009, 11:05 AM
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erick (Eric)
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In general Damon, the absence of the Moon in the sky is best. Unless, of course, you want to cruise the Moon's surface or go looking for lunar occultations!

The effect of the Moon is to wash out the sky with moonlight, generally all over, thanks to our atmosphere, but particularly bad close to it. Fainter objects just won't have contrast against the brighter sky.

However, visitors trip over things less and it is easier to find what you have dropped.

But, for observing some things, the Moon is not a great problem. Venus, Jupiter, Saturn - the presence of the Moon is no hassle. Looking at bright stars, open star clusters and splitting popular double stars - also no great problem. But the moment you are talking about nebulae, galaxies, globular clusters - you want to say "Bye bye Moon".

When you are showing people the sky, it is often useful to pick a night with some Moon around - a few days after new Moon is usually good. They can have a good look at the waxing crescent Moon, then as it drops low in the sky, fainter objects can be seen.
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  #850  
Old 06-05-2009, 07:21 PM
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AussieAaron (Aaron)
Its a Starry Starry Night

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Hello To Everyone, My name is Aaron, I am 22 and have been interested in Astronomy eversince i can remember, I had a telescope when i was really young, a long white thing with a wooden tripod and all i can remember seeing was a blurry dot with a small ring around it, Which turned out to be saturn, Thats when i was hooked, Tomorrow night i will attend the Wollongong Amateur Astronomy meeting for the first time and will start getting into it seriously, The thing i love about Astronomy is hard to say, Everyone will know what i mean, But you know the feeling you get when you in a pitch black field and all you can hear is the cool breeze flowing through the trees and just millions of stars, Its the most amazing feeling, just thinking about whats out there and how awesome the sky looks, Well anyway ill stop day dreaming..lol..well as i said my name is Aaron and i want to learn everything i can about Astronomy, Telescopes, Observatories and even Radio Astronomy, So i would like to say Hello to everyone and get to know you all as ill be a regular here on this forum for now on, Thanks for your time, Aaron
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  #851  
Old 06-05-2009, 07:28 PM
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Kevnool (Kev)
Fast Scope & Fast Engine

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Hi Aaron and welcome to IIS thanks for saying hello theres lots of information here for you to revel in, Enjoy your stay.

Cheers Kev.
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  #852  
Old 06-05-2009, 07:39 PM
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AussieAaron (Aaron)
Its a Starry Starry Night

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Thanks Heaps Kev, Looking forward to chatting with you all and good too see so much information on here for me to read, Ill be busy for hours..lol..Thanks again buddy
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  #853  
Old 06-05-2009, 11:33 PM
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Ric
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Hi Aaron and welcome to IIS, going to an Astro club meeting is a great way to get started. you'll be able to see and discuss the pro's and con's of lots of different scopes and get a feel of what is best for you.

Hope you have a great time with us.

Cheers
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  #854  
Old 07-05-2009, 08:28 AM
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AussieAaron (Aaron)
Its a Starry Starry Night

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Thanks Ric,
I also thought the same thing, Plus it will possibly give me the opportunity to make new mates that share the same hobby, My mates are all into Motor Cross, Cars, Pubs and so on, So hoping this wold give another range of friends with a different range if thinking, I have been looking into some Great Telescope last night and they have come along way since the last time i had one and the prices are great, So im looking forward to purchasing a good Scope and not to mention bits and pieces as i go along.
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  #855  
Old 29-05-2009, 07:31 PM
Hachi
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Smile Yo

Hello, I'm new here. I was recently inspired by an anime "Planetes" to start looking up into the sky. Of course, being the computer geek I am I haven't actually gone further than looking up a few images on the internet and signing up for this forum. I might risk letting in some natural (moon) light later and actually look up at the sky.

Kidding! Well, about the "not bothering to actually look at the sky" bit anyway... The sky is actually quite nice tonight so I'm going to kick start this new hobby (?) of mine by going outside a little later once a lot of the lights are out and take a good look up at something I've never really bothered to take too much notice of before (figuritively speaking).

I don't own either binoculars or a telescope and after some research have decided that for a beginning ameteur binoculars are probably the way to go. I'm poor so I can only spend like $60 max for now.

Anyways, Hello! My names Richard but you can just call me by my screen name (Hachi) since it's probably easier to remember. Cheers

Oh, and get ready for many extremely nooby posts from me on a regular basis.
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  #856  
Old 29-05-2009, 09:35 PM
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lacad01 (Adam)
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Hi Richard,
Plenty of good info here and plenty of good people to help out
cheers
Adam
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  #857  
Old 29-05-2009, 10:08 PM
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Kimbo (Kim)
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Hi Richard, Welcome to IIS

Binoculars are definitely a great way to start . 7X50 or 10X50 are a good size, anything larger & you generally need a tripod to use them (more $$$). Check out the 'Binoculars' thread directly below the 'Beginners start here' thread, it will give you more info. Enjoy your new hobby!!

Cheers,

Kim
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  #858  
Old 15-06-2009, 08:29 PM
hmv629 (T rod)
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Hi All im a 22 year aspiring astronomy student and a female...as far as to apply for university doing a bachelor of science in astronomy and astrophysics- I will find out in july.

I will be joining an astronomy club this week, and am keen to get a orion 4.5inch sky quest dobsonian or similar to start as this is what I have been recommended.

What do you think??

I could use all the info I can get !!!

Hope your all finding for what you are looking for

Peace


call me t-rod
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  #859  
Old 15-06-2009, 10:33 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Hi t-rod and to IIS

Do you think you could stretch to a 6" or an 8"? I think you would be happier with what you see.

Check out what Andrews has to offer:-

http://www.andrewscom.com.au/site-section-10.htm

6" - $299 8" - $549

But before you put any dollars down, have a night with your astroclub. Look at and through scopes and ask questions. They may well have scopes on loan to members so you can try one out.
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  #860  
Old 15-06-2009, 10:36 PM
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jjjnettie (Jeanette)
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Hi T-Rod,
Welcome to IIS
I feel you would do better to buy a more substantial scope. 4.5" just isn't going to keep your interest for very long at all. You'll be limited to to viewing only the brighter objects in the night sky.

You can pick up a 6" dob for $299, or an 8" dob for $549 from here http://www.andrewscom.com.au/site-section-10.htm
If you're quick they have one only 10" for just $599.
(I'm not affiliated with Andrews btw, just love their bargain prices)
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