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Old 01-02-2020, 10:22 AM
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GUS.K (Ivan)
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Quasar in Crater and Vela SNR.

Set up the 18 inch scope around 10.30 last night and had a look at the usual showpiece objects until the moon set, then spent a half hour on the Vela SNR trying out different magnifications and filters (OIII and UHC), the best view being with the OIII and 21mm Ethos. Even though the seeing wasn't the best this evening, it was relatively easy to trace out a sort of nebulous loop (and to make out the wispy filaments) which covered about 5 or so degrees.
Next up were two quasars, one in Crater and the other in Virgo. QSO B1104-181 in Crater is a blazar with approx magnitude of 15.9 to 16.2, and was a struggle to spot, being at the magnitude limit of my scope and the seeing didn't help either. Finding the location took about 10 minutes but spotting the quasar spanned another 20 minutes (to confirm the sighting) and I was able to spot it with direct vision about 20% of the time and with averted vision about another 20%, the rest of the time the seeing was too unsteady. So this quasar has a redshift Z=2.32 with a light travel time of 10.93 billion years.
I attempted to spot QSO 1224-1116 in Virgo (about 3 degrees west of M104) which is at about 10.8 billion light years, but didn't have any luck even though it is brighter than the Crater QSO at 15.1 mag. While there had a look at M104, always a beautiful sight in any scope. Will try for the QSO again tonight with some better charts
Thanks for reading.
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Old 01-02-2020, 10:47 AM
spiezzy
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great report Ivan very interesting read and what awesome objects to study

cheers Pete
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Old 01-02-2020, 12:53 PM
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Tinderboxsky (Steve)
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Very interesting. Certainly well beyond the reach of my equipment. Thanks for sharing your observations, Ivan.
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Old 01-02-2020, 01:21 PM
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GUS.K (Ivan)
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Thanks Peter and Steve.
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Old 01-02-2020, 08:46 PM
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Hi Gus,

I'd encourage you to keep trying with QSO 1224-112. I have seen it a number of times with my 18" f/4.9. NGC 4484 is a nice bright (Magnitude 1.4.1) marker galaxy only 20' away SE.

Best,

L.
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Old 02-02-2020, 11:14 AM
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GUS.K (Ivan)
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Thanks Les, was going to try again last night but conditions weren't great, I'll attempt it again in a few weeks.
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Old 20-02-2020, 06:48 AM
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GUS.K (Ivan)
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Finally spotted QSO 1224-1116 last night at magnitude 15.1, Red shift Z=1.98 with light travel time of 10.8 billion light years. Used the 18 inch scope with 13mm and 9mm eyepieces (154 and 222x magnification. Visible with direct vision most of the time, and limiting magnitude was around 15.6 going by visibility of a nearby comparison star. Seeing was average at best.
Also attempted to find a quasar in Leo QSO 1120+019 at mag 15.7 but no luck, will try again in better seeing.
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