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Old 25-11-2019, 11:16 AM
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Tinderboxsky (Steve)
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Venus-Jupiter close conjunction in daylight today

The closest Venus-Jupiter approach of just under 1.5 degrees for this conjunction is this morning. I was fortunate to have sufficient gaps in some fine light cirrus cloud to view this.

Using an LVW 22 (36X and 1.8 degree FOV), the two planets were framed on either side of the FOV with the bright blue sky background. Venus was blazing bright with an obvious irregular three quarter illuminated disc. Jupiterís disc was much fainter with the two main belts just visible.

The more interesting view was using my LVW42 (19X and 3.4 degrees FOV). Venus and Jupiter were nicely framed. Plus there was sufficient depth of field for the high floating waves of cirrus cloud to be in sharp focus. It gave the view a nice dynamic view with these floating waves of cloud passing through without blocking Venus and Jupiter.

Venus and Jupiter will have separated slightly by this eveningís twilight but will still be spectacular in the fading light

Scope: Vixen NA140SS and LVW eyepieces.
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Old 08-12-2019, 09:58 AM
Tropo-Bob (Bob)
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Thanks for this Steve. Your reports are always good reading.

I was in Brisbane on the evening that they were closest, but it was cloudy. Turns out that it is not only Cairns that has cloud problems.
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Old 08-12-2019, 01:31 PM
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Tinderboxsky (Steve)
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Thank you for your feedback Bob. My reports have been few and far between for a while. A long period of poor conditions and two months travelling have not helped.

The next daylight challenge I have been looking forward to for some time is the daylight occultation of Jupiter on Jan 23rd. Unfortunately I now have to go to Melbourne then and will miss the opportunity.

The observation will be a real challenge. The Moon will be at 27.8 days old. So, only 20 degrees from the Sun and not visible naked eye. Jupiter will be mag -1.9 and whilst this is normally quite easy to observe during daylight, it will prove difficult this close to the Sun.

Steve.

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Originally Posted by Tropo-Bob View Post
Thanks for this Steve. Your reports are always good reading.

I was in Brisbane on the evening that they were closest, but it was cloudy. Turns out that it is not only Cairns that has cloud problems.
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