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Old 03-01-2019, 05:46 PM
Startrek (Martin)
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DSLR in camera noise reduction and High ISO speed noise reduction

It pays to check your DSLR camera settings every few months as I have been using in camera noise reduction and high ISO speed noise reduction without even realising it for about a year ( silly me )
When capturing my images with BYEOS Iíve been watching the exposure time (say a 2 minute sub) count down and then a 2 minute noise reduction count down to zero and not even registering that Iím waisting 100% of my time on each sub as I have been taking my darks at the end of the session
The penny just dropped when I had another read of Jerry Lodriguss e-book on DSLR Astrophotography.
Gee no wonder I have been getting to bed really late on an average imaging session
Ive been using a 2 second pause and delay but might increase this to 5 seconds during the summer months to give the sensor a bit of cool down time
Cheers
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:54 PM
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On the bright side we get a laugh at your expense☺.

At least you found out.

I have thought the camera was clicking away dling 30 second captures only to find I had a 30 minute blown out exposure when Iooked☺

And one run with the focuser mask still in place☺.

Alex
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:55 PM
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Duplicate post deleted
Alex
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:57 PM
glend (Glen)
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Turning off all that processor hungry activity will generate less heat. The sensor itself does not produce much heat at all, it is the processor, or multiple processors in many cameras, running all these other activities that really heat up the inside of a camera, and thus the sensor by association and location. The battery is another big heat generator, if you can find a battery eliminator for your camera, buy one; this helps reduce internal heat.
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Old 03-01-2019, 06:13 PM
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For what its worth I find the LENR (Long exposure noise reduction) is best left on for nightscapes with a Canon EOS R. It improves contrast and removes background colour blotching and is time well spent.

For deep sky work though if you are using darks then yes best turn it off.

So its not a cut and dry always turn it off situation.

Greg.
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Old 03-01-2019, 06:20 PM
Startrek (Martin)
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Alex
Itís good to have a laugh and not takes things too serious. Iím wondering what else Iím doing wrong, although my images are ok I suppose I must be doing somethingís right
Glen
Thanks for the technical heads up on the heat generated within the camera
I have a remote power supply to my camera , so no internal battery, any heat dissipated from the power supply is below the mount and not inside the camera
I suppose that helps a bit
Cheers
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Old 04-01-2019, 07:01 AM
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Martin you are doing great images so yes you are doing things right.
Alex
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Old 08-01-2019, 11:33 AM
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The_bluester (Paul)
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Even worse, the darks you are shooting at the end would not actually be doing you any good. They will be a dark frame taken with the shutter open, with a second dark frame with the shutter closed subtracted from them. Been there, done that.

The biggest impact of using the in camera darks is the blowout in imaging time where a 30 second sub takes about 65 seconds to complete instead of about 35.
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