#21  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:00 PM
gregbradley's Avatar
gregbradley
Registered User

gregbradley is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 15,400
I know what you mean Chris, these DSLRs are incredibly complex.
I still didn't use all the stuff my 40D was capable of after a few years!

Greg.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:23 PM
2stroke's Avatar
2stroke (Jay)
The devil's advocate

2stroke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 816
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbradley View Post
I am not sure about the connectivity of mirrorless. You may be right and it may not be so easy to tether them to a computer. I'd have to check that aspect out. I was referring more to their compactness and overall feature list that often exceeds budget DSLRs. Things like 10 frames per second, HD video with AF, HDMI out, high MP high quality sensors like Nex 7's 24mp or Fuji XPro 1 special hi tech sensor which matches full frame for quality.

Its true hi tech gadgets lose value very heavily. That weighed on my mind when buying one. You want to get one early in the product cycle so you at least have it for a few years before its no longer newest and latest.

Still my D800E is the most fun and exciting camera I've gotten to date and I am very happy with it. Its still the current worlds best camera!
(a few Canon owners will disagree but its all part of the fun!).

Greg.
Agree 100% with features for sure, lol i would not call the 1100D a dslr in terms of function and features and i will probably never use it for a terrestrial camera. Though I think these types of camrea's are great for people wanting to get into dslr photography and learn how to use a dslr, lol being a point and shoot man myself i've learned a lot. I still find our cannon powershot better to use for terrestrial work, though photography is not a hobby of mine.
Lol green with envy here, its probably best i never use such a camera because its going to leave me wrecked for using low end and mid ends.

Anyhow has anyone found a good review with iso test comparisons, waiting to see how noise goes with the digi 5 processor, 75% less i've herd but wanting to see prof
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:26 PM
Bassnut's Avatar
Bassnut (Fred)
Narrowfield rules!

Bassnut is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,771
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaroo View Post
This is why I now have a super healthy respect for Leica. They don't bother with all the junk. They just take beautiful images in normal conditions and let you get on with composing rather than trying to find why button X isn't doing what it should according to menu item 53-4 when light falls below Y lux... they just let you get on with it. No zooms, nothing more advanced than aperture priority - and that's because focus can't be controlled other than by your index finger.
Thats BS. I don't deny Leica quality at all, but lack of control for even more money is snobbery and plays to a sort of placebo effect, "it must be always awesome at default settings because Leica knows best". It's similar with insanely expensive audio gear that only has a volume knob. It's wanky and just a market differentiator based on arrogance and ego. The green setting on most DSLR has the same effect without the lack of versatility when you want it.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:49 PM
Octane's Avatar
Octane (Humayun)
IIS Member #671

Octane is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Canberra
Posts: 11,158
Fred,

Not to defend Leica and their pricing, but, I understand that you pay big bucks for premium products. They're not for everybody. However, the lack of features on the Leica systems, I suspect, has something to do with what the tool was predominantly designed for -- street photography.

Yes, you can also use a DSLR or a point-and-shoot for street, but, the Leica's are inconspicuous tools. The subject is less likely to object to having a picture taken with a tiny camera than a big-ass DSLR with a beefy lens.

Chris, is it even possible to stick a 200mm or 300mm lens on those things? I've only ever seen them with short focal length primes for wide swathes of street.

H
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:50 PM
Omaroo's Avatar
Omaroo (Chris Malikoff)
Let there be night...

Omaroo is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Sydney/Cooma
Posts: 7,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassnut View Post
Thats BS. I don't deny Leica quality at all, but lack of control for even more money is snobbery and plays to a sort of placebo effect, "it must be always awesome at default settings because Leica knows best". It's similar with insanely expensive audio gear that only has a volume knob. It's wanky and just a market differentiator based on arrogance and ego. The green setting on most DSLR has the same effect without the lack of versatility when you want it.
Fred, a bit harsh. The proof is in the pud old son. I love the images coming out of my Leica - they suit my shooting style and the raws are awesome given the intent - that typical street grunge look. The WHOLE point about street photography, if you've ever done any, is NOT to have to fiddle with dials and settings. You pre-set your average focal distance as required by hand, and let the aperture priority do the rest in accordance with the lens you have mounted and pre-set ISO. You've got about a second to compose, shoot and make it look like it wasn't you before your subject walks out of frame. A big SLR is not going to do you any favours in these situations - and neither is a sub-quality compact - even though some great street photographers have proven that "simple" is best by taking great shots with the iPhone (http://www.justwhatisee.com/). The main premise behind Leica M-series is top quality optics and mechanics in a small and inconspicuous package. To coin a crappy and overused phrase - it's the weapon of choice amongst the best street guys in the world.

As far as pricing goes, they are prohibitively expensive, yes. The latest M9 Monochrom black and white machine is bang-on ten grand, body only. A 50mm f/.96 Noctilux lens is twelve grand. Go figure. What's a Canon 1D Mark-IV worth, body-only?

Horses for courses I guess. I have't been accused of being a snob before, so you're in luck - you're the first to do so and partly get away with it.

Last edited by Omaroo; 12-06-2012 at 06:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12-06-2012, 05:57 PM
Omaroo's Avatar
Omaroo (Chris Malikoff)
Let there be night...

Omaroo is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Sydney/Cooma
Posts: 7,628
Quote:
Originally Posted by Octane View Post
Fred,


Chris, is it even possible to stick a 200mm or 300mm lens on those things? I've only ever seen them with short focal length primes for wide swathes of street.

H
Humayun, no,well.... not really. The longest people use are around the 105-135mm mark. You don't go picking off sheep in the far paddock with a Leica.

I'm currently looking at a 75mm f/1.8 at the moment, which is about as long as I want to go. It will do for half-body portraiture at close distance.

Having said that, I've tried my 300mm Nikkor on my M8 and it works fine. Focus is guesswork because there is no coupling to the rangefinder frame line mechanism - but it works. I've even mounted it up to my Tak 90 for laugh.

Last edited by Omaroo; 12-06-2012 at 06:25 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 12:15 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Celestron Australia
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Australia
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Meade Australia
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement