#961  
Old 07-01-2010, 08:42 AM
GHOST (Jason)
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Originally Posted by erick View Post
Still at school, Jason? Have done or are doing lots of mathematics and physics? That will help.
Unfortunately Eric I've already completed my tertiary and astronomy wasn't the path I followed.

But I don't mind starting fresh and getting into the field, I just need something part time.


Thanks heaps for the assistance Mike appreciate all the help.

Cheers

Jason
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  #962  
Old 08-01-2010, 04:26 PM
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Roobi
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Amazed Noobi

Hi there.
Well i got my very first telescope at christmas time, something ive wanted since i was a lil one, and i have to say im amazed at how much i can see. It's quite a smallish telescope 5.12" and 650mm focal length celestron astromaster 130eq but i was clearly able to see saturn and its rings. Though quite small, it was still magnificent. I even managed to see titan.
I quickly whipped out my digital camera and tried to shoot it through the eyepiece, and suprisingly enough i actually got an ok image. I can't wait to get a proper camera, already im hanging to get some stonger lenses as i only have the 10mm and 20mm. I'm just wondering what everyone thinks would be the best eyepieces for me to get.
On a side note, i can't believe how much i'm learning. I'm focusing on the saucepan at the moment and trying to learn as much as i can about that area. Great nebula in orion looked cool last night, though i was surprised to see no colour. Is colour only seen at higher mags or only with filters?
As im sure you can tell, i'm so wrapped up in this now, i can barely sit still for excitement.
lol thanx for listening to my rambling guys and happy exploring.
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  #963  
Old 08-01-2010, 07:53 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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Hey Roobi, glad you are enjoying it. Your scope is the same size as my first one. You could get a shorter eyepiece to get more magnification, but remember, magnifying also makes it dimmer and gives you a much smaller field of view, so much harder to find objects and keep them in the field. On my 130mm scope I found the 10mm was only just useable, mainly only used the 25mm. You could save up some money and go get some premium EPs, but you are probaly better of saving for a bigger scope!!
Try and get yourself to a local club or observing night. Most observers are happy to let you see what different eyepieces will do and givce you a look and some advice.
As for colour, even bright nebs like M42 (Great Orion Neb) show only very subtle colour in big scopes and only when seeing and transparency are exceptional. Even then, seasoned observers may not see it. Magnification also dims objects so making colour even harder to see. Filters act by only letting certain wavelengths of light through, so improving contrast, they won't actually brighten or improve colour.
Anyway, continue exploring and see what else you can find.

Malcolm

Last edited by barx1963; 09-01-2010 at 01:20 PM.
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  #964  
Old 09-01-2010, 06:22 PM
GHOST (Jason)
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Hi guys,

I'm now looking to get a telescope but I'm not too sure which one I should get or what I should be looking for as there are so many different brands.

But one of the more common brands I've come across is the Celestron.

I'm looking for something for a beginner but will also last a bit as I don't want to have to upgrade too soon and I'm not to sure how much I should be spending.

Any recommendation would be much appreciated.

Cheers

Jason
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  #965  
Old 09-01-2010, 06:34 PM
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that_guy (Tony)
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Dob dob dob dob dob!!!!!! Dobsonian!!!!!!! It's cheap and incredibly reliable 6" starting from around $350...
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  #966  
Old 11-01-2010, 01:28 PM
GHOST (Jason)
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Originally Posted by that_guy View Post
Dob dob dob dob dob!!!!!! Dobsonian!!!!!!! It's cheap and incredibly reliable 6" starting from around $350...

Thanks for that mate. Would you know any good places in Melbourne where I can go get some decent telescopes?

Cheers mate
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  #967  
Old 11-01-2010, 02:22 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Search though "Equipment and Where to Buy" in here:-

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/links.html

I can recommend the Bintel shop in Camberwell, at 519 Burke Road.

York Optical are in the city at 114 Flinders Street.

There are a few others in Melbourne.

Several people are happy to mail order from elsewhere around Australia, eg. from Andrews Communications.

Carefully compare prices, options included and after-sales service.
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  #968  
Old 11-01-2010, 10:14 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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Yes, if intending for visual use, get a dobsonion, brand is probably not that important, Skywatcher, GSO, Saxon, Bintel all do the job. Look for aperture per dollar as your main criteria. Don't get sucked in by lots of eyepieces, you will see deals with 5 or 4 eyepieces, most of the time only the 2 longest ones will be the ones you use. Also, don't get sucked into the Computerised GoTo scope, unless thats really where you want to go, you end up payiong way more for less aperture, and in visual observing, aperturew always comes up trumps. It's no accident that at any star party, the visual guys almost always, and I mean almost always, have big scopes, and for most of them that means a dob.
As for dealers I have used Bintel and Andrews without any hassles, can only speak from personal experience though.
Best advice, before you buy, get along to a star party, club observing night or similar and try out a scope or two then make a decision. Snake Valley is on 12-15 of March I beleive and the Astro Soc. of Vic have a night at Heathcote on the 13th March also. Both are worth checking out!
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  #969  
Old 12-01-2010, 02:08 PM
GHOST (Jason)
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Thanks heaps Eric, Malcolm.

One thing I'm still a bit confused with is, what different images and sort of views with a telescope that has a large aperture say 300mm with the eye piece at the top to a more narrow telescope with a aperture of say 100mm and the eye piece at the bottom of the telescope?

Are they called a Parabolic reflector and a Refracting telescope?

Thanks again guys
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  #970  
Old 12-01-2010, 02:34 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Here is some reading for you, Jason:-

http://www.davidreneke.com/recommend...-for-beginners
http://www.davidreneke.com/buying-using-telescopes
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  #971  
Old 15-01-2010, 02:34 PM
berg meister
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Hi,

Been a member for a while but not really posted. As I live in Sydney, most of my Astronomy is on-line, naked eye, and in magazines. I do relish the times I get away from the city....particularly Braidwood (east of Canberra), where one chilly August night last year, the Milky Way was presented with unbelievable clarity - even more than later that night near Thredbo in the Snowies.

My first ever telescope was a cheap dept store type, but to view Saturn and see the rings, was unforgettable, from my rear door when I was living in Christchurch for a few years. Also viewed the Jewel Box cluster at the Arts Centre / Townsend Ob telescope in the city:

http://www.phys.canterbury.ac.nz/townsend.shtml


Really just wondering what I will get from the following set up:


Bintel BT-114EQ Deluxe Telescope https://www.bintelshop.com.au/Images/Stock/6327.jpg





This telescope has superior high quality optics with a 910mm focal length (f/8). Coupled with its sturdy German Equatorial mount any budding astronomer will delight in the views available. Resolve fine detail on the lunar surface, the Rings of Saturn, Equatorial belts on Jupiter, see stars in Omega Centauri Cluster, the dust lane in the Centaurus "A" galaxy, Eta Carina Nebula and many hundreds of other nebulae, clusters and some galaxies.
Quality fittings and accessories come standard:
- A 6 x 30 crosshair finderscope with quick release dovetail bracket and springloaded adjustment makes finding your target easy.
- Three 1.25" Plossl eyepieces (25mm, 15mm and 9mm) are included. They offer definite advantages over competing telescopes supplied with "cheap" eyepiece.
- A moon filter and a comprehensive instruction manual are also included. Optional Motodrive provides hand free tracking. Some simple astrophotography is possible with optional camera adapters. We include a one year warranty and in-store lesson if you require assistance assembling and using your new telescope.



As it is dicfficult to get decent views at present where I live, I am staying with this low end model until better living accomodation permits worth while observations. Thinking I might get some nice moon views if I stay at my son's place on the NSW Sth Coast maybe?

thanks for any advice
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  #972  
Old 16-01-2010, 12:40 AM
Afro Boy (Carl)
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Smile First night at MPAS

Just got home from my first visit to the Mornington Peninsula Astronomical Society (MPAS). It was great!

I set up my scope outside then went inside for a presentation. By the time I got out ready to take a look at Jupiter rising, two kind folks had collimated my scope for me! I can actually see things through it!

A basic 4" scope and I could quite clearly make out Jupiter and four of the moons. Got to see the Orion Nebula and just almost make out the trapezium part of it. Saw a few other bits and pieces in my own scope and plenty of amazing stuff in the monster scopes they had.

Had a great night so thanks to all involved. I would encourage any newbies like me to drop by either MPAS or your own local observatory for a good introduction to the skies.

Cheers,
Af.
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  #973  
Old 20-01-2010, 11:56 AM
Afro Boy (Carl)
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First real night of viewing

My first night out in the backyard a couple of weeks ago was okay although I had no idea what I was looking at.

After a night at MPAS I had a few targets I wanted to find myself in my own scope. Last night, the clouds in Melbourne cleared up and I went for it. Had a great night.

I started with Jupiter just after sunset. I managed to easily find it and could clearly make out three of the moons (two below and one above). There looked to be a fourth further down below-left. The moons had obviously shifted from the previous week at MPAS. It was kinda cool to have seen the difference even a few nights makes. My wife was also impressed once I managed to drag her away from some Top Model show!

Then off to the Orion Nebula. Now that I had seen it through some big scopes I knew exactly what to look for. Managed to just make out the 4 stars of the trapezium which took a bit of patience but was worth it.

At MPAS, one of the great sights I saw was 47 Tuc. It took me forever to find it as I couldn't see it with my naked eye. Spotted a small blurry star just below-right of the small Magellan clouds and then with a little moving about I stumbled on it. It was a bit fuzzy through my scope but I was pretty wrapped I managed to find it.

Then I moved off to Pleiades. Wow, it was crazy bright!

I then took a right to Sirius. My collimation must have been out a bit because it looked like it had a little bulge to the top-right of it. I doubt I managed to see the second star in there (Sirius is a binary yeah?).

Then a bit of a random tour around before going back inside.

Cheers,
Af.
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  #974  
Old 24-01-2010, 01:39 PM
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alistairsam
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dso's with an 8inch F6 newt?

hi,
i've been reading a fair bit, and got myself an 8inch F6 Bintel Newtonian on a Dob mount.

but so far, i haven't been able to see any decent nebula or galaxy with the scope apart from M42.
am i expecting too much?

below is what i have and use
2inch crayford focusser, 2" 26mm GSO EP, 1.25" 9mm Plossl EP, 2X 2" Andrews ED Barlow.

Now that Mars is visible, i tried viewing at the lowest and highest mag, but haven't been able to discern details. Jupiter was better.
I have collimated my scope, I got help at MPAS with a laser collimator.

I have cleaned the primary with distilled water with no damage at all.
I fixed an A4 sized black felt piece opposite the focusser inside the OTA to reduce reflected light as i have a street lamp just next to where i view.

I can easily see the 4 trapezium stars in M42 with good nebulosity.
i use stellarium to try and star hop, but have'nt had any luck in locating objects.
was thinking of building setting circles, but not sure if its worth the effort.

any advice on what I can realistically view with my 8" F6 and with which eyepieces?

I read an equipment review of a 10" GSO reflector and was amazed at what all he could see. going by that, an 8" should'nt be too far off, at least thats what i hope.
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  #975  
Old 24-01-2010, 03:07 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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The 8" is an excellent instrument for viewing DSO's, there are hundreds within reach of your scope. Use the 26mm eyepiece first, and I would suggest you get a medium power eyepice say 15mm or their abouts, if you can offord it get a wide field one rather than a plossl.

Mars is not easy at the moment, very low, you have to wait for moments of good seeing to pick up much detail, but you should be able to see the polar cap.

Good objects in the Southern part of the sky are

Eta Carina Nebula
NGC 3532 which is close to Eta Car
47 Tucanae, NGC 104
NGC 362 close to 47 Tuc
Tarantula Nebula
The Jewell Box NGC4755
Omega Centauri (it rises late best after 1am)

All these will look great in an 8" and several (Omega Cent, Eta Car, NGC 3532) are naked eye and all are locatable in a finder

In the northern sky you can try for

M67 Open cluster in Cancer
M43 just near M42
Rigels companion star

Anyway thats just some starters of the top of my head, see how you go.
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  #976  
Old 25-01-2010, 12:12 AM
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alistairsam
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thanks Malcolm,
will try to find them and let you know.
might get a wide view EP from Andrews. does the FOV have to be over 60deg and focal length below 20mm?
Does a nebula filter or OIII filter help for nebulae and galaxies?

heading to the Dandenong ranges this week on a clear night.
anyone know of any good viewing spots?
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  #977  
Old 25-01-2010, 05:10 AM
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iceman (Mike)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berg meister View Post
Hi,

Been a member for a while but not really posted. As I live in Sydney, most of my Astronomy is on-line, naked eye, and in magazines. I do relish the times I get away from the city....particularly Braidwood (east of Canberra), where one chilly August night last year, the Milky Way was presented with unbelievable clarity - even more than later that night near Thredbo in the Snowies.

My first ever telescope was a cheap dept store type, but to view Saturn and see the rings, was unforgettable, from my rear door when I was living in Christchurch for a few years. Also viewed the Jewel Box cluster at the Arts Centre / Townsend Ob telescope in the city:

http://www.phys.canterbury.ac.nz/townsend.shtml


Really just wondering what I will get from the following set up:


Bintel BT-114EQ Deluxe Telescope

This telescope has superior high quality optics with a 910mm focal length (f/8). Coupled with its sturdy German Equatorial mount any budding astronomer will delight in the views available. Resolve fine detail on the lunar surface, the Rings of Saturn, Equatorial belts on Jupiter, see stars in Omega Centauri Cluster, the dust lane in the Centaurus "A" galaxy, Eta Carina Nebula and many hundreds of other nebulae, clusters and some galaxies.
Quality fittings and accessories come standard:
- A 6 x 30 crosshair finderscope with quick release dovetail bracket and springloaded adjustment makes finding your target easy.
- Three 1.25" Plossl eyepieces (25mm, 15mm and 9mm) are included. They offer definite advantages over competing telescopes supplied with "cheap" eyepiece.
- A moon filter and a comprehensive instruction manual are also included. Optional Motodrive provides hand free tracking. Some simple astrophotography is possible with optional camera adapters. We include a one year warranty and in-store lesson if you require assistance assembling and using your new telescope.
Hi Berg Meister,

That's not really the first telescope I'd recommend. It's fairly small aperture and long focal length, not a great combination, and it's on a fairly small looking EQ mount which is likely to be fairly wobbly.

You really are best off looking at a 6" or 8" dob - much easier to use, more aperture, objects will be brighter and no hassle with the mount.

Quote:
As it is dicfficult to get decent views at present where I live, I am staying with this low end model until better living accomodation permits worth while observations. Thinking I might get some nice moon views if I stay at my son's place on the NSW Sth Coast maybe?

thanks for any advice
Anywhere away from city lights will be good. To view the moon though, dark skies don't really make any difference (through a telescope at least).
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  #978  
Old 25-01-2010, 11:59 PM
Afro Boy (Carl)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barx1963 View Post
Eta Carina Nebula
NGC 3532 which is close to Eta Car
47 Tucanae, NGC 104
NGC 362 close to 47 Tuc
Tarantula Nebula
The Jewell Box NGC4755
Omega Centauri (it rises late best after 1am)
I used this list to guide my observing tonight. Thanks for the suggestions Malcolm.

I had limited success but the ones I could find were quite spectacular.

I couldn't quite catch Eta Carina Nebula but did manage to get NGC 3532. 47 Tuc is one of my favourites at the moment so I'm pretty good at finding it.

Couldn't find NGC 362 but the sky in that area was pretty light polluted so will try again another night from elsewhere. Also couldn't find the Tarantula Nebula - there's quite a bit happening around there so it was hard to locate for me.

The Jewell Box (NGC 4755) was amazing. I thought I found it the other night and tonight confirmed it. The longer I spent on it, the more I managed to see. Caught a glimpse of a couple red stars (red giants?)

Omega Centauri is up too late for me!

So, mixed results tonight but worth finding a few new sights. If it wasn't for the nicotine addicted neighbour who had to to have a fag in full light every 30 minutes, I may have been a little more successful (and patient!)

Cheers,
Af.
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  #979  
Old 26-01-2010, 12:12 AM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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Well done Carl. NGC 362 is easy if you can find 47 Tuc. At the moment it is up and to the right a bit. They are basicly on the side of the Small Magellenic Cloud so if you can see that naked eye, it makes finding 362 easy.
Eta Car is "above" NGC3532, both are naked eye visible.
Congrats on the Jewell Box, still my favorite cluster, mainly 'cos it wa sthe first NGC object I found by myself! Still love looking at it and seeing all thopse faint jewells sparkle. The main red star in the centre I beleive is a red giant (Type M2Iab supergiant SAO 252073).

Malcolm
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  #980  
Old 26-01-2010, 03:12 PM
Dave88 (Dave)
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Hi all,
Having been a silent member for a little while now, I figure it's appropriate for a quick introduction. Most of my observing experience thus far has been through a 70mm Skywatcher refractor. Although I immensly enjoy exploring the skies, I regret that alot of the time I don't know what I'm actually looking at. This year I'm aiming to invest more time into the study of the constellations and the like, and, to learn how to star hop.
I currently have a 12" GSO dob on order along with a bundle of books, guides and current charts. I've also been impressed with the capability of the Argo Navis and will consider one down the line to help with my learning.
Like many, astrophotography is something I wish to pursue further down the track. But that will happen in due course. Small steps - as they say

Thanks all for a great forum

Dave
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