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Old 24-09-2010, 02:47 PM
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Octane (Humayun)
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Adobe shows off plenoptic lenses that let you refocus an image after it's taken

http://www.engadget.com/2010/09/23/a...us-an-image-a/

I have a nasty feeling that the software will only be available as part of (or integrate with) ACR/LR. waa waa.

But, for those that use that software, this might be pretty awesome.

H
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Old 25-09-2010, 07:38 AM
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There is also hardware involved.. plenoptic lens that takes information necessary for post-focussing.
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Old 25-09-2010, 08:21 AM
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At a quick glance it looks like it works on the same theory as registax, but a special lens to produce the multiple images.... Rather clever but will it take off.... Sometimes you want selective depth of field focusing ( portrait photography) I can't see the pros giving up their 600 f2.8 lenses for this kind of tech just yet. Still you never know
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Old 25-09-2010, 08:25 AM
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Interesting

Still, it might add a 3D effect to deep space images ?.

Cheers
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Old 25-09-2010, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
Interesting …

Still, it might add a 3D effect to deep space images …?.

Cheers
I don't think so.
The article (movie) is not offering the clear enough description of method used (it is gross over-simplification, suitable for average plebs), but the trick is in the lens (or lenses) used to obtain the image.
The software is used to pack that information into the file and then just uses the relevant part of information later when displaying the image.
It reminded me of a crude hologram..

Last edited by bojan; 26-09-2010 at 11:05 AM.
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Old 25-09-2010, 10:18 AM
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Interesting ..
Got me thinking and investigating .. (quotes from Wiki);
Plenoptic camera:
Quote:
A plenoptic camera, also called a light-field camera, and more correctly called a polydioptric camera, is a camera that uses a microlens array (also known as a lenticular lens array) to capture 4D light field information about a scene. .. Plenoptic cameras are good for following moving objects. A recording from a security camera based upon this technology could be used to produce an accurate 3D model of a suspect
and then ..
Lenticular lens
Quote:
A lenticular lens is an array of magnifying lenses, designed so that when viewed from slightly different angles, different images are magnified.[citation needed] The most common example is the lenses used in lenticular printing, where the technology is used to give an illusion of depth, or to make images that appear to change or move as the image is viewed from different angles.
and then
Integral imaging
Quote:
Integral imaging is an autostereoscopic 3D display, meaning that it displays a 3D image without the use of special glasses on the part of the viewer. It achieves this by placing an array of microlenses (similar to a lenticular lens) in front of the image, where each lens looks different depending on viewing angle. Thus rather than displaying a 2D image that looks the same from every direction, it reproduces a 4D light field, creating stereo images that exhibit parallax when the viewer moves.

Like lenticular, integral images can be created by digitally interlacing a set of pre-determined two-dimensional views to create three-dimensional and/or animation effects. Unlike lenticular, the imagery is viewable in all directions, within a limited viewing angle.
Subtle differences between all of them . but it would appear that the Adobe product, being Lenticular Lens based, may not possess strict holographic properties.

Cheers & Rgds.
PS: Apologies if you guys already know this. This post is only intended for curious onlookers .. (like me) .. Cheers & Rgds
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Old 25-09-2010, 10:24 AM
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Like those cheap 3D postcards (with plastic lens array in a form of vertical narrow ribs glued on top of the image).
This is different because it is 2D array.
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Old 25-09-2010, 10:43 AM
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Meaning that you get parallax views when looking from the top and the bottom as well as from the left and right sides ?

Kind of half way between traditional Lenticular and Integral (hologram) ?

Cheers
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Old 25-09-2010, 11:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigS View Post
Meaning that you get parallax views when looking from the top and the bottom as well as from the left and right sides ?

Kind of half way between traditional Lenticular and Integral (hologram) ?

Cheers
Exactly that.
But this thing contains information on focus depth as well.. not only parallax. so the post-focus is possible (by means of software).
A bit more complicated, but same/similar principle.
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Old 25-09-2010, 10:08 PM
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A similar product being offered by a German company.

http://raytrix.de/

Mark C.
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  #11  
Old 26-09-2010, 07:08 AM
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Hey Mark !

Welcome back !

Very interesting. This camera seems to use some other kind of technology?
Doesn't seem to be Plenoptic ?
'Realtime image processing for refocus, focal surface and 3D perspective'.

The graph they provide tells an interesting story also:
"Effective resolution against refocus depth. The units depend on the lens setting":

- 3MP effective resolution at the Focus plane (standard camera better);
- looks like about 0.5MP 'closer to the camera' ('units depend on the lens setting') but still better than plenoptic and a standard camera;
(Lens 100mm, focussed at 450mm aperture f/9.5 pixel size 0.009mm).
- non-mechanical operation;
- all info captured in one shot.

Wonder what this means for astro photography ?

Cheers & Thanks for that interesting info, Mark.
PS: Wonder what they cost ?
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Old 26-09-2010, 09:04 AM
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I don't think it contributes to astrophotography. I'm out of my depth here BTW and I don't know if the technology is significantly (if at all) different to that presented by Adobe - but they seem to address some common themes.

The German product (from parsing their website) is good for quality control / materials inspection (one application) - when small 3D effects are considered. If I use my imagination there could be medical applications.

I can envisage that a beautiful application is microscopy where it's difficult to get focus in all regions of interest - but I am really out of my depth (no pun intended).

Why I think there is little import to the astronomical community is that using multiple micro-lenses to effectively view a field from different perspectives means you're dividing up the incoming light into multiple viewpoints/perspectives (and therefore different signals) and that surely must dilute the the signal to noise ratio.

3D effects has got to be didley squat when viewing targets that are effectively at infinity. The ability to refocus could be argued to have merit but - as I suspect (but don't know for sure) - S/N ratio will suffer.

I only posted the reference as it appears to be current technology and not something really new (assuming that the technology really is comparable).


Mark C.
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  #13  
Old 26-09-2010, 09:41 AM
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Yeah .. I guess I've got my head in the clouds .. I'm thinking of those 'fly-thru' zoom-ins they do with the Hubble shots. I'm not sure, but I think that footage involves redshift data, to add the illusion of the depth dimension.

Better suited to close-up terrestrial macros shots (as the original posters mentioned).

Cheers
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