ICEINSPACE
Most Read Articles
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON New Moon
0%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney*
7:54 pm
Perth
4:54 pm
Auckland*
9:54 pm
New York
3:54 am
Paris
9:54 am
GMT
8:54 am




Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Talk

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 08-11-2017, 11:04 PM
Littlegreenmen (Paul)
Registered User

Littlegreenmen is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Perth
Posts: 9
Southern Galaxies in suburban sky's

Hi guys, after taking up astronomy about 6 months ago I've seen plenty of globulars, open clusters,nebula ect in my suburban backyard (Orange Zone I think) but despite trying I haven't seen any form of a galaxy (not even a faint fuzzy form if there is one).
I have a 12" f4.9 GoTo Dob so positioning the target should not be a problem.
Today I was reading another site "Cloudy nights" and there was a thread discussing "Northern hem Galaxies in suburbia" and there was a long list of targets which appeared to be no problem for our northern friends.
If there is southern hem galaxies available to me could someone kindly post a list for me ?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-11-2017, 10:39 AM
ZeroID's Avatar
ZeroID (Brent)
Lost in Space ....

ZeroID is online now
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 4,628
Hi Paul, Galaxies are DIM, very dim.
Your first one would be the Small Magellanic Cloud, NGC 292 which is a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way and just looks like a large scattering of stars really, no form to speak of.
After that Sombrero and Sculptor are visually possible but your eyes need to be well dark adapted to discern them. Southern Pinwheel is another.
My location is orange as well and it is possible but do not expect to see them leap out at you. Averted vision can help as well to first spot them.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-11-2017, 11:39 AM
madwayne's Avatar
madwayne (Wayne)
Registered User

madwayne is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Robertson NSW
Posts: 512
Hi Paul

I found this post on IIS via a quick Google search. Should help you as it gives the catalogue number, sizes, constellation, RA/Dec etc.

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/63-268-0-0-1-0.html

Download the list to Excel then sort on RA and that should then put them in some kind of seasonal order.

Hope that helps.

Wayne

PS - nice kit, I have one too but where I live there is minimal light pollution so the sky is literally the limit.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-11-2017, 11:48 AM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 3,943
I'm surprised Zero didn't mention The Large Magellanic Cloud, and
NGC 253 is easily visible. Centaurus A [NGC 5128] is easy to find, being
close to Omega Centauri [NGC 5139].
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-11-2017, 12:06 PM
Wavytone
Fringe Lunatic

Wavytone is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Killara, Sydney
Posts: 2,560
NGC55, 253, 300, 1316 (Fornax A), M77 (Cetus A) all should be easy in a 12”. M33 could be a bit low as is also the Andromeda galaxy. These are all easy in my 9” in Killara in northern Sydney, but what you see may be disappointing depending on how good/bad the conditions are (haze will kill galaxies) and your site (nearby lights).

Quite a few in Grus as well, notably the Grus quartet but at magnitudes >10 they are not visual in suburbia - you’ll need a dark sky site to see them.

Last edited by Wavytone; 09-11-2017 at 12:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-11-2017, 12:44 PM
bigjoe (Joe)
Registered User

bigjoe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: sydney
Posts: 624
Also try N3115 the Spindle in Sextans ...edge on and very ,very bright as is NGC1097
and M83; saw some spiral detail one incredible night from Penrith area in 6inch with averted vision!
Cheers bigjoe
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-11-2017, 02:43 PM
Littlegreenmen (Paul)
Registered User

Littlegreenmen is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Perth
Posts: 9
Wow guys thanks for the replys.Shows just how new I am to astronomy I didn't even know the Magelanic clouds where Galaxy's !
MadWayne I've book marked your list for reference.
The main problem I have apart from light pollution is surrounding fencing which means no views below 40 degrees. Anyway I don't mind averted vision or only seeing a "blob". So long as I can say I "saw it " that's all that matters.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 09-11-2017, 03:25 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 3,943
Many of the aforementioned galaxies are above 40 degs at various times of the year.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 09-11-2017, 04:23 PM
Wavytone
Fringe Lunatic

Wavytone is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Killara, Sydney
Posts: 2,560
Easier - use SkySafari, set date and time and location and see whats up - and you can turn on altaz coordinates to show whats above 40 degrees. Starmap Pro will also list what’s visible, in order of magnitude.

Last edited by Wavytone; 09-11-2017 at 07:55 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:10 PM
AndrewF (Andrew)
Registered User

AndrewF is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Warragul, VIC
Posts: 1
I'm in a similar position. 12" dob, similar light pollution, fences, trees etc. The first few I tried to find we're either extremely faint or I couldn't locate them so I just gave up for awhile. NGC253 is reasonably bright and easy to find though.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 09-11-2017, 09:59 PM
Wavytone
Fringe Lunatic

Wavytone is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Killara, Sydney
Posts: 2,560
I have to admit that being confined to suburban skies most of the time is why I have finally given up star hopping as there are so many big patches of sky where there is just nothing visible naked eye. Zip. Nada. Nothing.

I switched to a push-to setup with encoders, Nexus II and Sky Safari. Nirvana - with a short focal length - this meant I could happily target ANYTHING and put the scope bang on target every time.

Since then I have upgraded to an OTA with a 3109mm focal length, so I reluctantly joined the GOTO crowd primarily out of the need for a mount that tracks as well as encoders. Yes it works but it seems a lot of farnarkoibg for something that is fundamentally simple.

I could happily forgo the GOTO bit in return for encoders and decent software instead of a handset with a user interface that reminds me of a bad DOS game from the 1980s. But Skywatcher are so mean they can’t afford to use a modest capacitor and a few bytes of non volatile RAM to at least maintain date, time and the last location from one observing session to the next. Say a month. And ditch the cables for wifi. Cables are last century.

Better still if someone can ditch the abysmal Skywatcher handsets and interface directly to an iPhone with SkySafari.

Last edited by Wavytone; 09-11-2017 at 10:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-11-2017, 11:34 PM
bigjoe (Joe)
Registered User

bigjoe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: sydney
Posts: 624
Plenty of planetaries also to keep you busy. N3918 in Centaurus ..very blue in my 125 etx or 6inch achro or dob etc.
M57 in Lyra..The eight burst .(N3132) in Vela . Also the ghost of Jupiter(N3242 )in Hydra.. a green eye staring back at you!
Not to mention colourful double stars..Izar, Almaak , Acrux, Gamma Velorum etc. More than just galaxies for you.
Cheers bigjoe
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-11-2017, 10:20 AM
Sconesbie (Scott)
Registered User

Sconesbie is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Legana, Tasmania
Posts: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wavytone View Post
Easier - use SkySafari, set date and time and location and see whats up - and you can turn on altaz coordinates to show whats above 40 degrees. Starmap Pro will also list what’s visible, in order of magnitude.
I have a 10" dob.

This one is a ripper idea. I do this all the time (Sky Safari). The night before I look at "tonights best" and make a list in a notebook. The night of viewing, I use my phone or ipad and look at the current settings of the object and find it in the sky. Just make sure you have the red settings.

I have found Sombrero doing exactly this and in my backyard. True dark skies are best of course.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-11-2017, 11:57 AM
ZeroID's Avatar
ZeroID (Brent)
Lost in Space ....

ZeroID is online now
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Auckland, NZ
Posts: 4,628
Blimey, I mentioned a few to start with and I know there are heaps up there but I confess I struggle to find them from my 'orange' back yard and limited horizon. It's one of the reasons I moved to imaging and now mono. Really clear nights here are rare and precious.
Ignoring the SMC and LMC I have glimpsed Sombrero, Sculptor and Hamburger (NGC5128 visually and that's about it with the 10". My latest LP source to the SW has destroyed what was my best sky almost to the zenith so I have to make do with whatever I can find.

Good luck with your hunting, you have plenty to look for.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-11-2017, 01:20 PM
ChrisM's Avatar
ChrisM
Sandy Ridge Observatory

ChrisM is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Gippsland, VIC
Posts: 693
Paul, if you have a copy of the Astronomy Yearbook (doesn't matter which year) by Australians Ken Wallace, Glenn Dawes and Peter Northfield, I suggest that you refer to the Deep Sky Object table (towards the back of the book). It lists nearly 200 objects, giving name, type, RA / Dec, brightness, constellation, and which month of the year they are highest in the sky at 10 pm.

As others have already mentioned, NGC 253 (also known as the Sculptor galaxy or Silver Coin galaxy) is big and moderately bright; you should easily see something through your 12" scope, and it's favourably placed this time of year.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-11-2017, 01:47 PM
Littlegreenmen (Paul)
Registered User

Littlegreenmen is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Perth
Posts: 9
Ok guys thanks for continuing posts. Seems like most recommend NGC 253 amongst others so tonight's target is set ! Note many recomend Sky Safari so will implement that move shortly.In the meantime I've been using "Star Pointer" which tells me 253 will be in range about 8.30 tonight.
I'm not expecting it to blow my mind, all I wish for is something in the eyepiece that's not black.
BigJoe thanks for Planetary suggestions.Although I've seen them they always appear greyish at best so your achro or maybe younger eyes are certainly working.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-11-2017, 12:31 AM
Littlegreenmen (Paul)
Registered User

Littlegreenmen is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Perth
Posts: 9
Well finally came in from a short 2 hour session outside and "eureka " I have bagged my first Galaxy thanks to your posts.In fact you can double that NGC 253 and NGC 55.
Found it a bit of a struggle to start with as my alignment was a bit off but with some panning back and forth the grey smudgy cigars appeared,253s lower arm seemed to flow into a much larger illuminated area but this could have been my inthusiasm getting the best of me. As for NGC 55 this appeared dimmer but more as I expected in appearance.
Well nothing stopping me now although I must say they don't come close to the WOW I get with some of the clusters.
Thanks again all,now that I've got my first few posts on the board I'm sure I'll be back soon to rack your mind.

Paul.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-11-2017, 03:52 AM
Premordial (Max)
Pale green dot

Premordial is offline
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: NSW
Posts: 17
Hi Paul, there's also more galaxies to look forward to when winter returns. Example, M104 and other friends in Virgo. Even if no GOTO, I find them easy to find by star hopping.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 14-11-2017, 06:38 PM
Littlegreenmen (Paul)
Registered User

Littlegreenmen is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Perth
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Premordial View Post
Hi Paul, there's also more galaxies to look forward to when winter returns. Example, M104 and other friends in Virgo. Even if no GOTO, I find them easy to find by star hopping.
Your right Max,even with usually an increase in clouds I find viewing winter without “mozzies” most enjoyable!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 06:54 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Tasco Australia
Advertisement
Atik 16200
Advertisement
FLI Cameras and Imaging Accessories
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Star Discovery
Advertisement
Meade Instruments
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement