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Old 20-08-2012, 07:53 PM
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gregbradley
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Time lapse questions

I've answered your questions below:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDecepticon View Post
I have been trying quite unsuccessfully at doing timelapses. I bought the Timelapse book that Mike was talking about and it says to set the aperture to a large number so more of your field is in focus and a low ISO to control noise.


Is this for a daylight time lapse? Sure a higher F ratio gives a larger depth of field meaning a large amount of your view will be in focus at the same time.

Nighttime is a different story. You want highest ISO before your camera becomes too noisy, you want widest aperture (lowest F ratio your lens will do) to capture maximum light. Generally time lapses are with wider lenses like 14mm or so.


So, is this the f ratio setting on the camera or is it on the lens? I have several I can choose from.



Aperture is usually controlled by the electronics of the camera. Some older lenses allow manual control as well. Use the camera electronics.


It also says that the larger the number, the smaller the hole, the better depth of field, but i was just reading Greg Bradleys attempts at "bramping" and he is using a small f number, wide open, and a high ISO.

If you were shooting from day to night, how can you change your f ratio on the fly to compensate.


You can't easily. I believe there are devices coming out on the market to help but they aren't there yet. There is a bramping device that works on Canon cameras on the market.

I was trying the Triggertrap as I am using a Nikon and that other device is only for Canon's. Nikon inbuilt time lapse will do bramping but not carry through to proper nighttime exposures. It does the transition from day to night well but then once night it does not ramp up to the higher level I use for nighttime exposures. I use auto ISO for that and perhaps the 5D3 has that feature otherwise it may only be a Nikon feature.

I would not let this day to night transition stop you as lots of great time lapses don't do it either. Its not that great an effect.

Greg.


I am not overly knowledgeable when using daytime cameras. What am I missing?
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