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Old 16-02-2019, 11:35 AM
gary
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Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Mt. Kuring-Gai
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Meteor Trajectory software

Quote:
Originally Posted by earthsky.org
The scientific team that used YouTube videos to determine the trajectory of the Chelyabinsk meteor used the same method to track the trajectory of the bright meteor that crossed the sky over Cuba on February 1.
Quote:
Originally Posted by earthsky.org
After reconstructing the trajectory in the atmosphere, the Colombian astronomers “played back” the impact and found that the culprit, a rock with an estimated size of several meters and a weight of about 360 tons, came from an eccentric orbit around the sun with an average distance to our star of 1.3 astronomical units (one astronomical unit = about 93 million miles or 150 million km). Before impacting the Earth, the rock completed a turn around the sun every 1.32 years. All that came to an end on February 1, 2019, when both the rock and the Earth found themselves at the same point in space at the same time.
Article here :-
https://earthsky.org/space/chelyabin...eor-connection


Meteor trajectory determination software :-

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeteorTrajectories, github
In this repository you may find a series of tools used to reconstruct the trajectory of large meteors (super bolides) using public footage.

Most of these tools have been developed by the Solar, Earth and Planetary Physics Group in the Institute of Physics of the University of Antioquia (Medellín, Colombia).

Most of the data and scripts available here, correspond to what we used to reconstruct the atmospheric trajectory of the Cuba 2019 meteor. However, this same tools, and the methods implied, can be applied to reconstruc the trajectory of any other large meteor.

When using this data and tools please cite the following manuscript:

Zuluaga, J. I., Cuartas-Restrepo, Ospina, J., Sucerquia, M. (2019). Can we predict the impact conditions of meter-sized meteoroids?. arXiv preprint arXiv:1901.03980.
https://github.com/seap-udea/MeteorTrajectories


Paper (free) "Can we predict the impact conditions of meter-sized meteoroids?"
by Zuluaga et. al.:-
https://arxiv.org/abs/1902.03980
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